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FAELSAFE SMC CONSULTS ON KARIBA DAM FIRE PROTECTION PROJECT

Working in partnership with Alstom Ltd, Faelsafe SMC are offering their expertise as consultants to ensure that the new fire protection CO2 gas suppression system, installed by Chubb South Africa, runs on time, on budget and safely.

With numerous site visits required while working closely with all parties involved, Faelsafe SMC spreads it swings to around the globe to ensure the correct implementation of this project.

The double curvature concrete arch dam was constructed between 1955 and 1959 by Impresit of Italy at a cost of $135,000,000 for the first stage with only the Kariba South power cavern. Final construction and the addition of the Kariba North Power cavern by Mitchell Construction was not completed until 1977 due to largely political problems for a total cost of $480,000,000.

The Kariba Dam supplies 1,319 MW of electricity to parts of both Zambia (the Copperbelt) and Zimbabwe and generates 6,400 GW·h (23 PJ) per annum. Each country has its own power station on the north and south bank of the dam respectively. Lake Kariba, the reservoir created by the dam, extends for 280 km (174 mi) with a storage capacity of 180 km³.

The Kariba Dam project was proposed and implemented by the government of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, or Central African Federation (CAF). The CAF was a semi-independent state in Southern Africa that existed from 1953 to the end of 1963, comprising the former self-governing Dominion of Southern Rhodesia and the British Colonies of Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland. Northern Rhodesia had decided earlier in 1953 (before the Federation was founded) to build a dam within its territory, on the Kafue River, a major tributary of the Zambezi. It would have been closer to Zambia's Copperbelt which was in need of more power. This would have been a cheaper and less grandiose project, with a smaller environmental impact. Southern Rhodesia, the richest of the three, objected to a Kafue dam and insisted that the dam be sited instead at Kariba. Also, the capacity of the Kafue dam was much lower than that at Kariba. The Kariba Dam is now owned and operated by the Zambezi River Authority, which is jointly and equally owned by Zimbabwe and Zambia.

FAELSAFE SMC CONSULTS ON KARIBA DAM FIRE PROTECTION PROJECT

Working in partnership with Alstom Ltd, Faelsafe SMC are offering their expertise as consultants to ensure that the new fire protection CO2 gas suppression system, installed by Chubb South Africa, runs on time, on budget and safely.

With numerous site visits required while working closely with all parties involved, Faelsafe SMC spreads it swings to around the globe to ensure the correct implementation of this project.

The double curvature concrete arch dam was constructed between 1955 and 1959 by Impresit of Italy at a cost of $135,000,000 for the first stage with only the Kariba South power cavern. Final construction and the addition of the Kariba North Power cavern by Mitchell Construction was not completed until 1977 due to largely political problems for a total cost of $480,000,000.

The Kariba Dam supplies 1,319 MW of electricity to parts of both Zambia (the Copperbelt) and Zimbabwe and generates 6,400 GW·h (23 PJ) per annum. Each country has its own power station on the north and south bank of the dam respectively. Lake Kariba, the reservoir created by the dam, extends for 280 km (174 mi) with a storage capacity of 180 km³.

The Kariba Dam project was proposed and implemented by the government of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, or Central African Federation (CAF). The CAF was a semi-independent state in Southern Africa that existed from 1953 to the end of 1963, comprising the former self-governing Dominion of Southern Rhodesia and the British Colonies of Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland. Northern Rhodesia had decided earlier in 1953 (before the Federation was founded) to build a dam within its territory, on the Kafue River, a major tributary of the Zambezi. It would have been closer to Zambia's Copperbelt which was in need of more power. This would have been a cheaper and less grandiose project, with a smaller environmental impact. Southern Rhodesia, the richest of the three, objected to a Kafue dam and insisted that the dam be sited instead at Kariba. Also, the capacity of the Kafue dam was much lower than that at Kariba. The Kariba Dam is now owned and operated by the Zambezi River Authority, which is jointly and equally owned by Zimbabwe and Zambia.